Clothes brushes and opera glasses - A Random Look At.

So, I've a new video up today, I posted it a few hours ago and meant to write this blog about it, but life interrupted and I got sidetracked with a few delicious message from a girl on a dating app I'm using at the moment.
Hmm, might want to review the dating app at some point, it's not Tinder, but it's somewhat similar.
Anyhow, back to the blog proper.
Well, for the last few years I've been living in what was my grandparents house, and I've been slowly redecorating a room at a time, most of their things I keep stored in the front bedroom in various boxes and old furniture, wardrobes desks and so on, the room looked like a time capsule of 1950's Britain, post world war two furniture that looks so totally different to the stuff you get today.
And now I'm in the process of trying to redecorate the front bedroom, and going through their things and seeing what I would want to keep, either because it's practical or has sentimental value and what can be given away to charity shops.
If they want it that is. But that's a whole different story.
So first up we have the opera glasses, truth to be told these were actually something from my great grandmother that my grandmother kept as a keepsake.
It's hard to imagine anyone actually taking this into the cinema or a theatre in this day and age, if your vision is impaired in any way, chances are you have glasses to wear that are tailored to your eyesight and won't tire your arms out as these eventually would.
Sure they are light weight, but imagine holding them up for the duration of Lord of the Rings.
Just one of the movies, not all three.
And there's no real magnification here either, just one pre-set zoomed in setting, and the ability to adjust the focus, but it does give a good clear image.
Still if you are going off to the theatre and maybe have gotten some box seats and want to really look the part, this might be a must have. Just don't mix is up with your fancy cigarette case.
For me? It's a heirloom and something to remember both my grandmothers by, so I might put it on display somewhere.
Then we have the first clothes brush, a plastic thing that looks like it could be used to form the basis of any number of cheap sci fi props, like the PKE meter from Ghostsbusters, which I think DID start off life as such an item, before being re purposed for various other movies, like Die Hard 2. you can see one of the soldiers using it in the airport. Not sure ghosts are part of the armies remit though.
From the second you see it's packaging you get the feeling someone was trying to be funky and grab peoples attention. I'm guessing the box art has faded trough forty or fifty yeas of having kept in the bottom of a drawer somewhere with it's product never used.
From the colour of the plastic and the state the material used to clean your clothes with look and feel I doubt it's ever seen much use. And using it with your right hand is fine, it does exacty what it's supposed to do, and does it very well.
The inability to use it left handed because of the way the material grips your clothes, and that you can't even turn the head to allow you to use your other hand to help the cleaning process does it make it a bit awkward. Clearly taking your clothes off in most if not all cases is the only way to go.
Just not all of them.
Least not at the same time.
Oh well. Can't win em all, eh?
And then we move onto the second, wiry clothesbrush, the Genie, whose box looks even older and could feature in a museum.
A look at this is kinda terrifying, as in my mind's eye I see it tearing my clothes apart in the same way I imagine wire wool would do to my skin if I decided to use that stuff to clean my hands if they were dirty.
But this thing HAS been used, significantly even, and obviously does work, no damage to the clothing at all and the fluff and any dirt that was on was gone quite quickly.
As if it was wished away.

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